365 Wrestling, Day 10: Joe Black vs. Will Huckaby, Dog Collar Match (Southern Honor Wrestling, 1/10/20)

365 Wrestling, Day 10: Joe Black vs. Will Huckaby, Dog Collar Match (Southern Honor Wrestling, 1/10/20)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

In addition to focusing this project on matches I haven’t seen, I’m also aiming to spotlight wrestlers who I feel don’t get enough credit for their work. This match involves two of said wrestlers, Joe Black and Will Huckaby. I’ve worked as a commentator or “authority figure” at shows involving both, who put together a memorable feud in 2019 in Southern Honor Wrestling that culminated a year ago today in a Dog Collar Match. You can watch this match on IWTV

Let’s dive in, shall we?

The Context

This match culminates a feud that lasted about six months. Black issued the throwback challenge for a dog collar match, and SHW held a special contract signing at a prior event, where Huckaby slices his arm and signs with his own blood. Gruesome, but compelling. An excellent video detailing the rivalry runs right before the match and does a better job explaining the issues between Black and Huckaby than I can in words, so I recommend you just go watch that before checking out the match. Both men are underrated talkers and Black especially shines through. This line stands out: “Your blood that you signed the contract with is gonna be the same blood I coat my hands with and wipe on my chest as war paint.” Oh my, that’s good stuff.

The Match

I’ve talked about a big-fight feel for several of the matches thus far in this project and it’s in full effect here as well. The video recapping the feud primes the pump and the entrances add extra sizzle, with Huckaby and Black both dressed as homages to famous Marvel characters (the Incredible Hulk and Wolverine, respectively).

What follows is nearly 30 minutes of one of the most physically intense matches I remember seeing in quite some time. Black and Huckaby start out at a slower pace than I expected given the “blood feud” build, but this merely allows more time for the violence to escalate.

There are two referees assigned to the match and Huckaby immediately sets a tone, delivering a KO punch to one of the officials when the bell sounds. Huck is in full heel mode for this match. After Huckaby powerbombs Black twice through a table at ringside (watch the table explode on the second, and half land on Joe in what could have been nasty), he threatens the referee still standing with the chain until the official agrees to unlock him. Huckaby goes wild, dismantling the ring to expose the boards underneath the canvas. Then, when a package piledriver fails to produce the three count, Huck starts removing boards, flinging them across the ringside rail in a melee reminiscent of watching Bruiser Brody and Stan Hansen run amok in All Japan.

Black more than holds up his end as the gutsy, undersized, fan favorite. He’s definitely got the crowd behind him and he summons the spirit of the character who inspired his gear for the match, taking a serious beating but rallying or “regenerating” each time. Along the way he busts out one of my favorite moves from Black’s arsenal, a suicide dive into a tornado DDT on the floor. His offense is just as physically punishing, if not moreso, than Huck’s. Once the boards are removed to reveal the metal substructure of the ring, Black dumps Huckaby on not one but two front suplexes into the abyss.

Both men end up getting released from the chain linking them, which takes away from the hype surrounding the stipulation, but they compensate for any disappointment with–you guessed it–more violence. We see blood. We see weapons. We even see green mist. Things spill out of the ring and into the parking lot, where hostilities are capped by a protracted brawl around and on a car in the parking lot before Black finishes it with a Falcon Arrow onto the front windshield.

Random Thoughts

— I got chills twice before the match even began: once from the video chronicling their feud and once from Joe’s entrance.

— At one point in the build to this match, Black blasted Huckaby in the head with a glass bottle, leading to an eye injury that had Huckaby wearing an eyepatch, even on shows for other promotions or in different states. That type of storyline continuity is rare on the independent level, where two guys could be embroiled in a hated rivalry one night and then teaming together the next and it all ends up on YouTube by the following Wednesday.

— The production values on this match and the entire event video were excellent. The commentary? Not so much. Black and Huck are killing each other in the culmination of a long-running feud, but the commentators just seem detached, and lacking emotion on their call.

Final Rating: 7.0

As said for other matches in this ring, this is a very good match that is worth seeking out and watching. If you’re not familiar with the promotion or the story Black and Huckaby have told leading into the match, the video on this IWTV stream does an excellent job encapsulating their rivalry. Even as televised promotions continue to gobble up talent on contracts, there’s still a treasure trove of untapped, unsigned talent on the independent circuit. Black and Huckaby, and the match they have here, all serve as testaments to that.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

What’s Next

Things get Dangerous in 1992 for a six-man tag from a WCW B-show.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 9: Fabulous Ones vs. Moondogs, Anything Goes (Memphis, 1/9/84)

365 Wrestling, Day 9: Fabulous Ones vs. Moondogs, Anything Goes (Memphis, 1/9/84)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

The territorial era of wrestling had something for everyone. In Mid-South Wrestling, Bill Watts centered his promotion around guys who were either legitimately tough or had impressive athletic backgrounds or both. World Class Wrestling had an atmosphere that was part wrestling, part rock show, with wild brawls between the Von Erichs and the Fabulous Freebirds. Pacific Northwest Wrestling in Portland was known for its longer-format matches that could end up being a showcase of technical wrestling or a total bloodbath.

And then there was Memphis. There were several eras of Memphis wrestling but the best known was known officially as the Continental Wrestling Association, when Jerry Jarrett (Jeff’s dad) split away from Nick Gulas.

If you’ve never seen 1980s Memphis wrestling… it’s wild, y’all. The promotion held weekly shows at the Mid-South Coliseum every Monday, and hyped them on TV that aired live on Saturday mornings. Having a major arena event once a week allowed all kinds of creative leeway. One week, if Jerry Lawler were to claim he could beat Bill Dundee and Dutch Mantel with one hand tied behind his back, well, that Monday you might see that very match happen. Win or lose, the story could continue the following week. The TV show often got crazy, with uncontrollable brawls fairly common. At the center of the maelstrom, trying to maintain comtrol, was Lance Russell. Several years ago, Segunda Caida likened Russell to a strait-laced host “trying to run a smooth TV show if it wasn’t for these crazy  Muppets.”

Today, we visit Memphis for the first time (but definitely not the last) in this series, to watch The Fabulous Ones, Stan Lane and Steve Keirn, take on The Moondogs in an Anything Goes Match from the Mid-South Coliseum.

You can find this match on YouTube with minimal difficulty.

The Context

Even though they weren’t exactly clean-cut, the Fabulous Ones had a pretty-boy gimmick they played to the hilt since being paired together in 1982. They also benefited from getting an immediate endorsement, on camera, from Memphis wrestling legend Jackie Fargo. They became huge fan favorites almost right asway. Long before Bray Wyatt wandered into his funhouse or any of the other video packages that have become a fairly standard method of introducing new talent in wrestling for any number of promotions, CWA put together a few music videos to hype this team.

Videos like this, for example …

and this …

This type of gimmick would have had the opposite effect today — making Lane and Keirn either a punchline as a comedy act or huge heels. In Memphis in the 1980s, though, it only added to their appeal. In several stints in the promotion, they held tag titles on 17 (!!!) separate occasions. Then again, rapid-fire title changes also were rather common in Memphis, especially with the aforementioned weekly shows at the coliseum.

The lady-killing heroes find themselves going against The Moondogs. There were several iterations of the Moondogs through the years, but they always had the same basic premise: rugged-looking dudes with shaggy, bleached-blond hair, cut-off jeans, and a major propensity to brawl. The ongoing battle between them led to this match, where anything goes and the referee wouldn’t even step through the ropes, instead remaining ringside.

The Match

Ever seen a wrestling match touted as a huge grudge match, but where the participants start out with basic, traditional wrestling like a collar-and-elbow and a headlock? This… is not that match. Rex and Spot jump the Fabs as soon as they reach the ring and a brawl ensues in and around the squared circle. The end result is a variety of wrestling that would make the philosopher Hobbes proud: it’s nasty, brutish, and short. Russell announces an official time of eight minutes once the decision is rendered, and a couple of minutes of footage are trimmed from what is accessible.

What’s here, though, is a hoot from bell to bell. Spot makes quick and frequent work using a crutch to bludgeon the fan favorites, especially Keirn. The viciousness is there and, combined with liberal use of the weapons (multiple crutches!!!!), the heat is palpable and the Memphis crowd loves every minute of it.

The chaos amplifies when the action spills to the floor in earnest. Keirn tries to flip him through a table at ringside, but Rex doesn’t complete his rotation on the backdrop so he kinda sorta smashes into it headfirst. These are thick, wooden tables, though, and it doesn’t break. Instead Rex picks up this heavy table and heaves it into the ring, smashing Lane into the propped up table. Keirn shows up with a long leather strap out of nowhere and starts wreaking havoc. One of the Fabs eats a piledriver from Rex. It’s chaos and carnage, through and through, until the Fabs grab the signature bones of the Moondogs, which usually get wielded as weapons. A couple of shots with the bones …

Excuse me…

Where was I?

Oh yes. Use of the bones sends the Moondogs fleeing for the exit, and a 10-count by the referee cements victory for the Fabs.

Random Thoughts

–The Moondogs are managed by Jimmy Hart, who spent several years as the resident arch-villain of the Memphis territory before making his way to the WWF. Wrestlers would come and go, but Hart remained the nexus of neer-do-wells in the promotion, usually throwing enemies at his main nemesis, Jerry Lawler. Hart’s work as a manager in Mid-South is not to be missed, and is much more effective and entertaining than what he got to do in WWF or WCW.

–The referee in this match (the bald-headed gentleman at ringside) is Paul Morton. You might know his son, Ricky Morton, one half of the Rock’n’Roll Express. Morton’s grandson, Kerry Morton, is now wrestling as well.

–People don’t talk enough about Lane’s outstanding body of work as a tag wrestler. In addition to teaming with Keirn, he spent time with Bobby Eaton (who we saw in singles action earlier this month) in the Midnight Express. Lane also was the original partner of Tom Prichard in the Heavenly Bodies before the arrival of Jimmy Del Ray.

Final Rating: 6.1

I’m a sucker for the wild, brawling style of wrestling in front of a red-hot crowd and this is a good example of that type of match. They did themselves a favor by keeping it short, and the intensity and high heat of the battle made an abbreviated contest make sense. This match also represents a fine snapshot of the wild and woolly atmosphere of Memphis wrestling in the 1980s.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

What’s Next

We head to Atlanta for a dog collar match to settle the score.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 8: Kenta Kobashi vs. Minoru Suzuki (NOAH Great Voyage, 1/8/05)

365 Wrestling, Day 8: Kenta Kobashi vs. Minoru Suzuki (NOAH Great Voyage, 1/8/05)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

We made it a full week into the project, you guys! Only 51 weeks and 357 entries to go …

A few days ago I watched and wrote about a Minoru Suzuki match and opined about Suzuki’s greatness. While doing research and seeking out matches to watch, I found this treasure from Pro Wrestling NOAH‘s Great Voyage 2005, where Suzuki challenged Kenta Kobashi for the GHC Heavyweight Title.

You can find this match on Youtube with some strategic searching.

Let’s get to it.

The Context

This is the 13th defense for Kobashi, who won the GHC Title in March of 2003. That reign has created a long-running story in NOAH, where one grueling title match after another have worn down Kobashi.

Suzuki comes in as the arrogant heel freelancer, and at the time, this is just his third match in a NOAH ring.

The Match

Watch a Suzuki match from recent years (yeah, he’s still going strong) and you’re likely to see him go at his opponent throwing forearms or open-hand slaps — especially if he’s going against a longtime nemesis like Yuji Nagata or someone with a similar hard-nosed style like Tomohiro Ishii. Here, giving up a ton of size to the champion and being considerably younger, Suzuki uses his quickness and catch wrestling skill, quickly establishing himself as the fleet-footed arrogant challenger to the beloved champion’s lengthy reign.

When I say beloved, I mean it. The NOAH crowd is so behind Kobashi that when he clamps a headlock on Suzuki at the five-minute mark, the fans LOSE THEIR MINDS. For a headlock. The two wrestlers stick with it; Suzuki crumples in the hold as Kobashi wrenches, and when the action briefly spills to the floor, Kobashi re-applies the headlock, gets back to his feet, clambers up on the apron and drags Suzuki into the ring, still ensnared. The crowd loves every bit of this.

Choices like an extended headlock seem wise the way Kobashi is moving so gingerly. A pair of massive knee pads indicate the accumulation of damage he has accrued in 15-plus years wrestling regularly for both All Japan and NOAH, and any actual running by Kobashi is absent aside from one Burning Lariat where he charges off the ropes to wallop Suzuki at center ring.

Kobashi brings the intensity and has the fans, but Suzuki makes this match go. After eating machine gun chops in the corner by the champ, Suzuki catches Kobashi’s arm on a follow up and transitions into his hanging triangle choke over the ropes, setting up a focus on the right arm of Kobashi that remains a theme of the challenger’s offense for the rest of the contest. Suzuki briefly tortures the right arm of Kobashi, a harbinger to the brutal, would-be-banned-by-the-Geneva-Convention type of torment he inflicts on opponents’ limbs in more current bouts. Kobashi weathers the storm, surviving a standing RNC on the outside of the ring by crawling off the elevated entrance aisle. In another example of the evolution of Suzuki’s character and wrestling, Suzuki hits his Gotch piledriver — a sure-fire match ender today — but doesn’t even go for a pin after hitting it here, reveling in downing the popular champion and toying with him.

Instead, Suzuki is focused on making the champion submit. He elicits anguish with an octopus stretch. Then, after Kobashi rallies with the aforementioned lariat and his powerbomb into a jackknife pin, Suzuki promptly counters into an MMA armbar. Kobashi outlasts this too, and then unleashes hell on Suzuki with two clubbing clotheslines, a running lariat, and a backdrop driver. Slaps by Suzuki only anger the champion, who unleashes yet another lariat and three consecutive backdrop drivers. A final, feeble slap by Suzuki shows the outcome is inevitable, as a Burning Lariat finishes the match and Kobashi’s 13th defense.

Random Thoughts

–Great Voyage is one of the biggest events of the year in NOAH and this match definitely has that big-fight feel.

–This would be the final successful defense for Kobashi, who goes on to lose the GHC Title to Takeshi Rikio in March.

Final Rating: 6.8

There’s a lot to like and the novelty of the matchup is one of the main attractions for watching. Making an early-match headlock compelling and creative was quite the feat. Still, with Kobashi facing some physical limitations, the end result only reaches a certain height. I’ve not watched nearly as much of Kobashi and the others from the Four Pillars era of All Japan as I should — definitely something I’ll remedy as this project continues.

What’s Next

Tag team mayhem in Memphis.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 7: Ric Flair vs. Bobby Eaton (WCW Main Event, 1/7/90)

365 Wrestling, Day 7: Ric Flair vs. Bobby Eaton (WCW Main Event, 1/7/90)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

Every story you hear about “Beautiful” Bobby Eaton being one of the nicest people in wrestling?

To quote Han Solo in The Force Awakens, it’s all true. All of it.

In the 2000s, Bobby lived in my hometown for a little while. I got to meet him through a mutual friend. He had a wrestling school downtown, for a little while, and I helped move the ring and apparatus into the upstairs location. He even came to the house a few times. Years later, after Eaton had moved on and I was working as a commentator for an independent promotion in the area, Eaton had been booked as a manager. Not only did he remember me, but when I said something about being tired (I was loading trucks at FedEx in the wee hours of the morning at the time, as my writing work had slowed down), he offered me a coffee.

His coffee.

In addition to being an all-around good guy, Eaton also is a fantastic wrestler. He’s known best for his tag work, especially in the Midnight Express with Stan Lane and Dennis Condrey, In today’s installment of 365 Wrestling, we’re taking a look at Eaton in singles action, as he challenges Ric Flair for the NWA Worlds Heavyweight Title from a 1990 Episode of WCW Main Event.

You can find this match on YouTube.

The Context

This is the second title shot for Eaton in a span of about a month. In the first, Flair won by DQ after Eaton’s ever-present manager Jim Cornette interfered to keep Beautiful Bobby from getting ensnared in the figure-four leglock. Cornette cuts a pre-match promo for his man, and hints that this time Stan Lane will be watching as well.

Flair was in the midst of a rare run as babyface champion, less that two months removed from settling the score in a feud with Terry Funk that remains one of my favorites of all time. (Note: if you haven’t seen it, go and watch his matches with Funk from the 1989 Great American Bash [arguably one of the best pay-per-views of all time] and Clash of the Champions IX, both available on the WWE Network. About a month after this match airs, Flair flips back to the heel side, when he and the Andersons kick out Sting from the Four Horsemen.

The Match

Flair spent so much of his career, especially during his runs as champion, bumping and selling and doing all he good to make his opponents look strong. Flair gives plenty to Eaton, who centers his assault around the neck of the champion, but it’s Eaton who embraces the role of making his foe look like a million bucks. Particularly, Eaton makes Flair’s chops look devastating. Flair does his part by laying them in (evidenced. by Eaton’s rapidly reddening chest), but Eaton takes some huge bumps off them, most notably one from, the apron that sends him facefirst to the floor. It’s not just the chops; around the five-minute mark, Eaton takes a shoulder tackle from Flair at center ring and spills all the way out of the ring. Eaton puts his body on the line in the final minutes, taking a backdrop on the concrete floor.

Let it be clear, this is a showcase for both wrestlers. One recurring theme throughout the match is the battle of strikes between Flair’s chops and Eaton’s punches (which always look excellent). Flair busts out his “Flair flip” over the turnbuckles twice: once when he tumbles to the floor and again when he dashes down the apron, scales to the top, and clobbers Eaton with a forearm smash.

Meanwhile, Cornette plays his role at ringside well, interfering at a couple of opportune moments to whip the crowd into a frenzy and add extra sizzle to the match. Ultimately, Cornette’s tactics bring down Eaton, as Flair shows his “dirtiest player in the game” rep, cutting off another attempt at interference by Cornette, grabbing the tennis racket, and using it to wallop both the manager and his challenger before scoring the decisive pin.

Lance Russell puts on a tremendous performance as the commentator for this match. He’s calling the match by himself (which I can tell you, from experience, is a challenge) and does an altogether excellent job. Simultaneously, he builds the story of the match, reacts organically to major events as they happen, and gives a straight call of the action without delving too far down any one path. Russell makes a side headlock by Flair around the five-minute mark of the video sound devastating. Later, when Eaton starts to take control, he makes a callback to Flair’s previous neck troubles from Funk piledriving him through a table the previous May.

Final Rating: 7.2

This is a very good TV main event with significant stakes and sees two of the best from their era facing off in a rare one-on-one encounter. Both men come out of the match looking strong. My only major complaint is that, in spite of his skill, you never really buy Eaton as having a legitimate chance to become champion, given the midcard status of the Midnight Express at the time of this match.

What’s Next

We get a second look at Minoru Suzuki in his only singles battle with one of Japan’s all-time greats.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 6: Awesome Kong vs. Gail Kim, No DQ (TNA Final Resolution 2008, 1/6/08)

365 Wrestling, Day 6: Awesome Kong vs. Gail Kim, No DQ (TNA Final Resolution 2008, 1/6/08)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

Are we still amid the peak era for women’s wrestling? Have we reached that peak? The prominence of women’s wrestling definitely has grown in recent years. Major promotions’ women’s divisions spent the 1990s earmarked mostly for bra-and-panty type content or forgettable filler matches — assuming a women’s division even existed at all. Today, that’s changed. Women have headlined pay-per-views, including a WrestleMania.

TNA Wrestling (now known as IMPACT) didn’t even institute a women’s title until late 2007 — more than five years after the promotion started running. The quality has ebbed and flowed through the years but, today, their Knockouts division holds up with as good a collection of female talent as any other company: Jordynne Grace, Deonna Purrazzo, Rosemary, Kimber Lee, Taya Valkyrie, Su Yung, just to name a few. And it all started with a rivalry between Gail Kim and Awesome Kong, the competitors in today’s selection as part of 365 Wrestling. In this one, Kim defends her Knockouts Title against Kong in a No DQ Match from Final Resolution 2008.

You can watch this match on YouTube, and I also have embedded it below:

The Context

Kim became the first Knockouts Champion in the fall of 2007, and her major rival during that reign was Kong, who had made a name for herself in Japan and on the U.S. independent circuit before coming to TNA. The rivalry between Kim and Kong helped put the Knockouts Division on the map and established it as an alternative to the women’s matches coming out of WWE at the time.

You also might recognize Kong from her role on the GLOW Netflix show.

The Match

Certain stories just work in wrestling, and they’ve been told countless times through the years. This is one of them, with the gutsy underdog babyface (Kim) going against the unstoppable juggernaut heel (Kong). Kong is in her element in this match, battering Kim and throwing her around. An early exchange on the ringside floor helps set the tone, with Kong menacing Mike Tenay and Don West and teasing an Awesome Bomb through the commentary table. Meanwhile, Kim does a great job helping to make Kong look like a monster. She takes a spinning backfist while seated on the top turnbuckle, taking a spill that looks even nastier when one leg gets hooked, leaving her dangling above the floor.

They reap plenty of fruit from the No DQ stipulation. A brawl through the crowd whips the Impact Zone fans into a frenzy and that battle sees the first major momentum shift in the match in the champ’s favor, when Kong misses on a charging attack and Kim zeroes in attacking Kong’s lefty arm and shoulder. Later, after Kim eats a sweet-looking wheelbarrow facebuster and narrowly kicks out, Kong releases her frustrations after the near-finish by annihilating the official with an Awesome Bonb, then a chairshot. Ultimately, Kong’s aggression proves to be her undoing; Kim gets the chair and delivers multiple blows, followed by a splash off the top for another near fall counted by a replacement referee. When Kong hits Kim with a chokeslam for another close two count, and Kong goes to powerbomb that referee as well, Kim ensnares Kong in a schoolboy for the pin, after which the official flees in terror.

Random Thoughts

–TNA/IMPACT has produced a huge amount of nonsense through the years, but much of the in-ring product is good to great. The Impact Zone crowd added a lot to this one, even if some or most of them may have been plants.

–Speaking of nonsense, after meeting in a title match with a stipulation, these two wrestled AGAIN on the subsequent episode of TV, where Kong won the title after interference from her new manager. Why not do that here, especially since Tenay explicitly mentions “an associate” of Kong’s being in attendance for the pay-per-view? Beats me.

–Kim’s facial expressions and mannerisms after felling Kong with the chairshots and splash, only to get a two count, were great.

–A couple of unprotected chairshots in this one, which always makes me cringe a bit given what we have learned in recent years about concussions.

–This was one of two TNA pay-per-views in 2008 called Final Resolution, with the other happening in December. Weird.

Final Rating: 5.9

This rivalry between Kong and Kim helped establish the new Knockouts division, and this is the best match from their feud that I have seen. It’s a solid, satisfying watch in the “three star” range.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

What’s Next

Two of my all-time favorites collide one on one in this contest from 1990.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 5: 8 Man Tag (Pacific Northwest Wrestling, 1/5/80)

365 Wrestling, Day 5: 8 Man Tag (Pacific Northwest Wrestling, 1/5/80)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

Like any creative art, certain performers or practitioners don’t get the credit they deserve while still active. For me, “Playboy” Buddy Rose is perhaps one of the most underrated wrestlers of all time. While Rose was a mainstay at the top of the card for Pacific Northwest Wrestling (the home promotion for today’s match), he didn’t reach the heights of fame and fortune that many of his counterparts did in the 1980s.

Had Rose come along 10 or 15 years later, I wager his legacy would be quite different. While each territory and promotion had its own hallmarks stylistically during this era, Rose shines brightly in Portland through his combination of tremendous interview skills, meticulous mannerisms in the ring, and bumping heedlessly to make his opponents look like a million bucks. I assure you, this won’t be the only time you see Rose on this list.

Today, we’re taking a look at a two out of three falls tag match from 1980 featuring Rose — PNW’s top heel at the time — teaming with the Kiwi Sheepherders, Butch Miller and Luke Williams (you may know them better as the Bushwhackers), and Sam Oliver Bass (better known as Outlaw Ron Bass). Their opponents are the quartet of Roddy Piper, Rick Martel, Dutch Savage, and Stan Stasiak. You can find this match on YouTube.

The Context

This is the latest chapter in a feud between Rose and Piper that began the prior spring. Rose has surrounded himself with a collection of henchmen known as Buddy Rose’s Army, currently consisting of the Sheepherders and Bass.

Martel is new on the scene in Portland and being billed as the exciting, young fan favorite. The rest of Piper’s team consists of Savage, a mainstay in PNW and one of the promoters of the territory; and Stasiak, who perhaps is best known for his “heart punch” and being the man who dropped the WWF Title to Bruno Sammartino to begin Bruno’s second reign as champion. By this point, Stasiak is in the twilight of his career.

This match follows the format of most featured bouts on Pacific Northwest Wrestling TV at the time: two out of three falls, with an ad break, interview, or a segment with the show host Frank Bonnenma between falls. Often times, wrestlers go to the locker room between falls, something I’ve not seen anywhere else.

The Match

The video picks up about two minutes into the match and the crowd is red-hot for everything happening. This match looks to achieve a few goals, in no particular order. First, to build up Martel for an imminent shot at Harley Race and the NWA Worlds Heavyweight Title. Second, to continue the feud between Piper and Rose. Third, to establish Rose’s Army as a force. I feel the match accomplishes all three objectives.

Most of the action is fairly basic pro wrestling, but it’s all well-done and keeps the crowd engaged, especially in the first fall, which lasts more than 20 minutes. Rose is involved on the three big highlights of the match: a rapidly-paced exchange with Piper in the opening minutes, begging off from Martel into the corner before getting Irish whipped into the opposite turnbuckles and throwing himself headlong above the turnbuckles to smash into a long pole extending from the ringpost, and then, in the second fall, feeding into a late hot tag by Martel, who busts out a huracanrana (in 1980!!!) as part of his comeback.

Rose’s selling makes all four of his opponents look strong at various points, whether it be taking an exaggerated bump on the apron after taking a punch from Savage, or selling Stasiak’s “reverse pumphandle armbar”, as Bonnenma calls it, like he’s being interrogated in a medieval torture device. After he gets his left arm punished for several minutes by the quartet of fan favorites, Rose actually goes all the way to the back, returning with an elbow pad that I thought was the harbinger of a loaded-weapon trick. Once the first fall finally ends, with Bass getting a submission on Stasiak after zeroing in on a previous leg injury, this match loses quite a bit of steam heading into the second fall. The intensity continues to diminish with the minute-by-minute calls of ring announcer Don Owen (the promoter of the territory), making a time-limit draw finish as obvious as a flashing neon sign. Things dial back up for the final minutes, with Martel making the aforementioned hot tag and all eight men hitting the ring for a brawl at the one-minute remaining call.

Random Thoughts

— The shenanigans between Rose and Piper in 1979 included Rose, in an act of sublime dastardly heeldom, setting fire to Piper’s kilt from the Crow’s Nest broadcasters’ position while the Rowdy Scot was taking part in a tag match. Fun fact, PNW pre-taped its TV show at the time, but fans watching thought it was happening live and called the fire department.

— The heels sell every attempt at Stasiak’s heart punch like they’re avoiding death itself. Great to see.

— The Sheepherders have a completely different look than you probably are used to, with their long shaggy hair, and matching red, white, and blue singlets.

Final Rating: 6.0

This one is definitely worth seeking out to watch. The second fall is skippable until the late tag by Martel and the final flurry of hostilities involving all eight men. You get a good look at Rose, in his prime and before his later weight gain, although he still remained a quality performer even with the extra pounds, in my opinion. It’s also a great look at a young, highly-energized Piper, who definitely has his working shoes on, especially for the exchanges with Rose. Piper is incredibly over with the Portland fans, who live and die with each attempted comeback whenever Piper finds himself being beaten down by Buddy Rose’s Army.

What’s Next

It’s the ladies’ turn, as two of the top female wrestlers from the 2000s battle for a title in a No DQ brouhaha.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 4: Yuji Nagata vs. Minoru Suzuki (NJPW Wrestle Kingdom 7, 1/4/13)

365 Wrestling, Day 4: Yuji Nagata vs. Minoru Suzuki (NJPW Wrestle Kingdom 7, 1/4/13)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

I’ve been fortunate to see most of my favorite wrestlers in person through the years. Right now, there’s one guy on the top of my “bucket list” to watch live, and that guy’s name… is Minoru Suzuki. Suzuki is one of my current favorites to watch. He delivers sadistic, believable offense with a maniacal glee I find captivating. After being de-emphasized somewhat by New Japan in 2019, Suzuki enjoyed a resurgence of sorts in 2020, first by challenging Jon Moxley for the NJPW U.S. Title after not receiving a match on either end of the Wrestle Kingdom 14 doubleheader, and then carrying a major share of the load for most of the year after NJPW returned to action following three months off due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Suzuki was also part of my favorite “no crowds” match from 2020, a battle with Yuji Nagata in the opening round of the 2020 New Japan Cup. These two wrestlers are both over the age of 50 but they delivered a compelling and legitimately hard-hitting contest that left them showing clear signs of the physical toll of the match.

As 365 Wrestling continued, I decided to take a look at their most recent meeting inside the Dome, from Wrestle Kingdom 7.

The Context

At the time this match was touted as the final collision between Nagata and Suzuki, with Nagata getting the upper hand in their last one-on-one meeting, as part of the G1 Climax the previous summer. Final collision? Hardly. Nagata and Suzuki have wrestled fairly often since then, including two singles meetings in 2020 and another fresh altercation in the New Japan Rambo at Wrestle Kingdom 15. After both got eliminated from that battle royal, they brawled to the back, still trading forearms. Fight forever, indeed…

For those who don’t know, Wrestle Kingdom is the biggest show of the year for New Japan — its WrestleMania equivalent, if you will. It always takes place January 4, and always in the Tokyo Dome.

You can watch this match on New Japan’s streaming video service, NJPW World.

The Match

After Suzuki’s entrance, we cut directly to the beginning of the match, and Suzuki and Nagata begin to lay into each other with some wicked-looking strikes. If you watched any of their encounters in 2020 or at the Tokyo Dome earlier today, this should come as no surprise. Today, Suzuki’s style is embodied by forearm strikes that echo with a meaty thwack, his headlong sprints into corners and guardrails, and his overall incitation and perpetration of violence, usually grinning at his foes and laughing maniacally at them even when they pummel Suzuki with devastating blows.

Suzuki in 2013 is younger, of course, but also has more mass on his physique and less of a sadistic nature though he’s just as cruel and calculating. He shows hints of the persona known well today, cackling with glee while torturing Nagata in a leg submission. It’s not a one-man show. Nagata more than holds up his end of the deal, showing plenty of fire and battling back time and time again from the relentless assault of Suzuki.

I won’t make an attempt to regale you with every strike, hold, and suplex in this match because frankly it won’t do justice to the actual exchanges in the ring. The facial expressions, however, are everything: whether they’re inflicting punishment or selling the effects of the conflict. Take special note of how Nagata sells the standing rear naked choke by Suzuki in the final moments of the match.

Ultimately, Blue Justice — and the good guys — prevail, with Nagata delivering his Exploder suplex immediately into a bridge following 17 hard-fought minutes.

Random Thoughts

— Wrestle Kingdom usually has less bells, whistles, and pageantry than WrestleMania but this match definitely had a bigtime feel after Suzuki had his “Kazi ni Nare” theme music performed live by Ayumi Nakamura and her band on the stage of the entrance area.

— Suzuki is seconded in the match by a younger, shaggier Taichi, who has evolved and really improved for New Japan in the last couple of years.

Final Rating: 7.4

This is a very good (though not quite great) grudge match that is worth going out of your way to see and lives up to the mystique of a big bout in the Tokyo Dome. If you’ve not seen this match, it’s definitely a valuable watch — whether you’re a fan or a current wrestler. While you’re at it, check out their New Japan Cup match from the summer of 2020… it’s even better.

What’s Next

We head to the Pacific Northwest, and four decades in the past, for an eight-man donnybrook.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

Have a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling, Day 3: Juventud Guerrera vs. Mortis (WCWSN, 1/3/98)

365 Wrestling, Day 3: Juventud Guerrera vs. Mortis (WCWSN, 1/3/98)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

Our third installment of this unique traipse through the history of costumed murder gymnastics is also the first Reader Recommendation of the series.

You see, back when the Monday Night Wars were in full swing, WCW became VERY aggressive signing wrestlers to contracts. This created a glut of talent — more than could be used at any one time (much like what WWE faces now, even with all its different “brands. Anyway, this also led to some bizarre and highly entertaining matchups on WCW’s three C-level shows: WCW Saturday Night, Pro, and Worldwide. We reach into that wacky grab bag for today’s match: Juventud Guerrera vs. Mortis from the Jan. 3, 1998, episode of Saturday Night.

The Context

Mortis spent most of 1997 feuding with Glacier. This evolved into a tag rivalry, with Mortis and Wrath (aka Bryan Clarke or Adam Bomb) taking on Glacier and Ernest Miller. The whole angle between them basically got dropped by late summer of 1997.

As for Guerrera, by the time this match aired, he had been with WCW for about 16 months. That included sporadic appearances on the flagship show Nitro, and several challenges for the TV and Cruiserweight titles, but no real success to speak of yet.

The Match

Tony Schiavone spends a little time on commentary trying to build a story around this match, that Mortis was out to claim he was the best masked wrestler in WCW. The size difference between the two is… significant. Mortis starts out with some basic clubbering but the match hits a second gear after an artful bit of interference by James Vandenberg (better known as the Sinister Minister these days), who yanks down the middle rope to send Juvi spilling to the floor in an excellent bit of timing.

After that, things get wild, starting with Mortis busting out this:

After consulting with WCW super-enthusiast and technical wrestling specialist Jeff Connelly, we’re going to call this a deadlift pumphandle fallaway slam. It’s not so much the trip as the landing — Juvi gets dropped throatfirst across the top rope then crashes back to the canvas.

Mortis isn’t done. He follows up with an electric chair into a sitout facebuster. Though Mortis dominates most of the match, Juventud gets a few chances to shine: executing a partial tilt-a-whirl into a sleeper that Dusty Rhodes delightfully calls a “whirlybird”, and then countering an original Flatiner (from a fireman’s carry off the second rope) with a sunset flip powerbomb. Soon thereafter, Mortis finishes it, blocking a leap off the top by Juvi with a standing Flatliner — called “the D.O.A.” by Schiavone. Later, as Kanyon, he starts using this as the Flatliner.

Random Thoughts

Mean Gene Okerlund shills the WCW Hotline prior to this match. That really took me back, you guys … I don’t remember ever calling it, though. How about you?

— It’s the first episode of WCWSN since Starrcade ’97, and Schiavone and Dusty spend a good bit of time on commentary talking about all the controversy, and how Sting is the new world champion. If you weren’t following wrestling at that time, you probably won’t understand how unique and impressive the build for that match was … and how disappointing the actual match between Sting and Hollywood Hogan ended up being.

— This match basically occurs in a vacuum from a booking perspective. Even though he’s in glorified enhancement talent mode here, Juventud won the Cruiserweight Title for the first time less than a week later on Thunder, later embarking on a feud with Chris Jericho that costs him his mask. Meanwhile, Mortis abandons the gimmick altogether by February, allying with Raven.

Final Rating: 5

There’s nothing wrong with the action here, but it’s one of those matches that is just kind of there for me. Sure, Mortis busts out a couple of crazy moves (most notably the one in the gif above), but the match itself is skippable. Booking moves for both render it irrelevant and there’s no real heat, drama, or stakes in what amounts to a glorified squash for Mortis except for a couple of big moves by Juvi.

What’s Next

Two grumpy old men collide to bludgeon one another relentlessly in a massive venue.

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

What’s your favorite random match from a WCW C-show? Have a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.

365 Wrestling: The Master Index

365 Wrestling: The Master Index

365 Wrestling is my project for 2021, where I’m going to watch a wrestling match for each day of the year, from that day of the year. Here’s a running index of the content so far:

“Rules” and Details on 365 Wrestling

January 1: Rey Mysterio, Jr. vs. Tajiri (SmackDown, 1/1/04)
January 2: New Year Death Match (Big Japan, 1/2/13)
January 3: Juventud Guerrera vs. Mortis (WCW Saturday Night), 1/3/98
January 4: Yuji Nagata vs. Minoru Suzuki, NJPW Wrestle Kingdom 7, 1/4/13
January 5: 2/3 Falls, Buddy Rose’s Army vs. Roddy Piper, Rick Martel, Dutch Savage & Stan Stasiak, Pacific Northwest Wrestling, 1/5/80
January 6: No DQ, Gail Kim (C) vs. Awesome Kong (TNA Final Resolution, 1/6/08)
January 7: Ric Flair vs. Bobby Eaton (w/ Jim Cornette) (WCW Main Event, 1/7/90)
January 8: Kenta Kobashi vs. Minoru Suzuki (NOAH Great Voyage 2005, 1/8/05)
January 9: Anything Goes, Fabulous Ones vs. Moondogs (CWA Memphis, 1/9/84)
January 10: Dog Collar, Joe Black vs Will Huckaby (Southern Honor Wrestling, 1/10/20)
January 11: Ricky Steamboat, Dustin Rhodes & Ron Simmons vs. Dangerous Alliance (WCW WorldWide, 1/11/92)
January 12: Paul London & Brian Kendrick vs. William Regal & Dave Taylor (SmackDown, 1/12/07)
January 13: Lioness Asuka vs. Michiko Omukai (ARSON, 1/13/02)
January 14: Bryan Danielson vs. Chris Hero (ROH Hell Freezes Over, 1/14/06)
January 15: Stan Hansen vs. Ashura Hara (All Japan, 1/15/82)
January 16: Dory Funk, Jr. vs. Billy Robinson (Houston, 1/16/81)
January 17: New York Rumble (WWF at Madison Square Garden, 1/17/94)
January 18: Jerry Lawler vs. Jos LeDuc (w/ Jimmy Hart) (CWA Memphis, 1/18/81)
January 19: Rockers vs. New Orient Express (Pat Tanaka & Kato) (WWF Royal Rumble, 1/19/91)
January 20: Allie Kat vs. Savanna Stone (SUP Graps, 1/20/19)
January 21: Ricky Steamboat & Sting vs. Rick Rude & Steve Austin (WCW Clash of the Champions XVIII, 1/21/92)
January 22: Jumbo Tsuruta & Great Kabuki vs. Michael Hayes & Terry Gordy (All Japan, 1/22/84)
January 23: Ricky Morton vs. Brad Armstrong (IPW in Asheville, NC, 1/23/96)
January 24: Chavo Guerrero, Jr., Lizmark, Jr., Super Calo & Juventud Guerrera vs. La Parka, Psicosis, Silver King & El Dandy (WCW Souled Out, 1/24/98)
January 25: Hikaru Shida vs. Sakura Hiroto (WAVE, 1/25/15)
January 26: Mr. Wrestling II & Kevin Sullivan vs. Austin Idol & Masked Superstar (Georgia Championship Wrestling, 1/26/80)
January 27: Rosemary vs. Samara (RISE 2 — Ascent, 1/27/17)
January 28: Last Man Standing, John Cena vs. Umaga (WWE Royal Rumble, 1/28/07)
January 29: Serial Thrillaz vs. Hardy Boyz (OMEGA, 1/29/99)
January 30: El Generico vs. Jushin Liger (PWG, 1/30/10)
January 31: Steve Grey vs. Zoltan Boscik (Joint Promotions, 1/31/79)

January Review


February 1: El Mesias vs. Takeshi Morishima (AAA, 2/1/10)
February 2: Rock ‘n’ Roll Express vs. British Bulldogs (AWA/AJPW/Central States When Worlds Collide, 2/2/89)
February 3: Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic Semifinal, Kayden Carter & Kacy Catanzaro vs. Dakota Kai & Raquel Gonzalez (WWE NXT, 2/3/21)
February 4: Japanese Death Match, Super Crazy vs. Tajiri (ECW, 2/4/00)
February 5: Jumbo Tsuruta & Genichiro Tenryu vs. Riki Choshu & Yoshiaki Yatsu (All Japan, 2/5/86)
February 6: Los Guerreros vs. Team Angle (WWE SmackDown, 2/6/03)
February 7: Ben Carter vs. B-Boy (ACTION, 2/7/20)
February 8: Undertaker vs. Hunter Hearst Helmsley (WWF Shotgun Saturday Night, 2/8/97)
February 9: El Texano, Silver King & El Fantasma vs. Samu, Fatu & Fishman (UWA, 2/9/92)
February 10: Kelly Klein vs. Mayu Iwatani (ROH Bound By Honor, 2/10/19)
February 11: Junkyard Dog & Dusty Rhodes vs. Ted DiBiase & Matt Borne (Houston, 2/11/83)
February 12: Jim Breaks vs. Adrian Street (2/12/72)
February 13: Kana vs. Meiko Satomura (Triple Tails, 2/13/11)
February 14: Steel Cage, Steve Austin vs. Vince McMahon (WWF St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, 2/14/99)
February 15: I Quit, Jake Manning vs. John Skyler (PWX Rise of a Champion IX, Night 1, 2/15/14)
February 16: Monster’s Ball, The Wolves vs. Decay (TNA, 2/16/16)
February 17: WWE Women’s Tag Title Elimination Chamber Match (WWE Elimination Chamber, 2/17/19)
February 18: Slim J vs. Andrew Alexander (NWA Chattanooga, 2/18/11)
February 19: Dave Finlay vs. Tajiri (SMASH, 2/19/12)
February 20: Chris Hero & Mike Quackenbush vs. Kevin Steen & El Generico (CHIKARA, 2/20/05)
February 21: White Castle of Fear, Sting vs. Big Van Vader (WCW, 2/21/93)
February 22: Booker T vs. Bret Hart (WCW, 2/22/99)
February 23: Randy Savage & Lanny Poffo vs. Lou Winston & Jerry Bryant (Memphis, 2/23/85)
February 24: Jordynne Grace vs. Skylar (Beyond, 2/24/18)
February 25: Mistico vs. Ultimo Guerrero (CMLL, 2/25/05)
February 26: No DQ, AJ Styles vs. Sandman (NWA-TNA, 2/26/03)
February 27: Satoshi Kojima vs. Drew McDonald (Reslo, 2/27/95)
February 28: Prince Nana vs. Ace Darling (ECWA, 2/28/04)

February Review

March 1: Bruno Sammartino vs. Ernie Ladd (WWWF, 3/1/76)

365 Wrestling, Day 2: New Year Death Match, Abdullah Kobayashi vs. Shuji Ishikawa (Big Japan, 1/2/13)

365 Wrestling, Day 2: New Year Death Match, Abdullah Kobayashi vs. Shuji Ishikawa (Big Japan, 1/2/13)

365 matches in 365 days, each from that specific date on the calendar? Challenge accepted. Welcome to 365 Wrestling.

From cruiserweight excellence on January 1, we pivot to blood-soaked mayhem in the second installment of the series. While New Japan Pro Wrestling has made a tradition holding its major event of the year every January 4, another Japanese companies have their own noteworthy dates each calendar year. Big Japan Pro Wrestling, which features both a strong style division and a death match division, has kicked off its yearly campaign with an event on January 2 dating all the way back to 1997 (and skipping 1999, for some reason).

Specifically, we’re firing up the main event from Big Japan’s January 2 event in 2013, with Abdullah Kobayashi defending the promotion’s Death Match Title against Shuji Ishikawa in a New Year Death Match. I have never seen either man in action, so we’re just going to dive right in. You can watch this match, and several Big Japan events, on IWTV.

The Context

Kobayashi has been BJW’s Deathmatch Champion for more than a year, since winning the title on December 18, 2011. Kobayashi and Ishikawa wrestled each other multiple times in 2012, including a successful defense by Kobayashi in May in a Fluorescent Light Tubes and Free Weapons Death Match. There’s a video package detailing the build to the match, where Ishikawa challenges Kobayashi after a successful defense, and then a subsequent contract signing. Both meetings end the same way, with Ishikawa attacking Kobayashi, stuffing his head in a toilet and, at the contract signing, spraying Windex on and up his ass (I wish I was kidding).

The Match

The stage is set with various means of mauling prior to the match, with light tubes propped vertically against opposite sets of ring ropes. A barbed wire board is propped in one corner, while, across the way, a pane of glass leans ominously against the corner pad. A third corner includes what looks to be a plant of some type, which we’ll get to later and made more sense to me after some research.

Kobayashi and Ishikawa get right to working plunder into the match; several light tubes are shattered in the opening minute, and the barbed wire board soon follows. I won’t even try to detail all the specific moves and tactics these two use but suffice to say that the blood quickly starts flowing. Ishikawa makes liberal use of several items from a Grocery Bag of Doom he brings with him to the ring. While several of the weapons quickly get destroyed, they build nicely to use of the pane of glass, which Ishikawa lays flat against three propped chairs and scales the ropes, only to get superplexed through it in the most spectacular spot of the match.

With no weapons left to use on one another, champion and challenger resort to trading strikes — including several shoot-style headbutts — in an exchange that makes Kobayashi look more formidable than anything else in the match to this point. Ishikawa gets the better of the champ, though, and finishes it with a splash off of the top rope. The blood is profound (and spatters one of the ringside cameras late in the match in an excellent visual) but when assessing all the violence, Kobayashi definitely takes the worst of it over the course of the match and has lacerations all over his body by the time the final bell rings.

Random Thoughts

So, after watching this match, I did some research online about New Year’s traditions in Japan, and several are incorporated into the match as weapons. Specifically:

–Kobayashi comes to the ring with an orange tied to the top of his head, which apparently represents the continuation of family.
–Ishikawa busts out a Kagami Mochi, which is a New Year’s decoration made of two round rice cakes. There’s a special ingredient in this one that I’m pretty sure was a razor blade. Whatever it is, it’s sharp and cuts open Ishikawa quickly and profusely once Kobayashi shoves it into his head.
–For most of the match, there’s a plant staying in one corner that I’m pretty sure is a deathmatch take on Kadomatsu, a plant decoration that incorporates bamboo shoots, plum trees, and pine trees and that Japanese tradition believes to be the temporary dwelling place of gods, who visit to bless the people living in the homes it decorates. Families keep it outside their home until January 7, then burn it on the 15th. It’s one of the final pieces of plunder destroyed in the match, and what Ishikawa doesn’t know is that Kobayashi has replaced those bamboo shoots with Folger’s crystals–I mean, er, green-painted light tubes.

Final Rating: 5.8

People tend to either love or hate death matches. I’ve certainly seen some fantastic ones, and watched others that were just awful. This battle fell in the “good” range for me. I tend to prefer matches of this genre where they build to the weapon use, and the biggest spot is the culmination. That really isn’t the formula they follow here, but it worked because of the wicked exchange of strikes near the end. Having a red-hot crowd certainly helped. Ultimately, if you like death match wrestling, you’ll like this. If you don’t like death matches, just skip it.

What’s Next

We make our first (but definitely not our last) foray into the grab bag of bizarre matchups that embodied WCW C-shows in the late 1990s. See you then!

Here’s the complete, ongoing list of matches in this project.

Got a match you’d like me to watch as part of this 365 Wrestling project? Agree or disagree with my take on this match? Let me know by using the contact form on this site, or reach me on Twitter.